Earwig

Earwig

Earwigs are fast-moving, beetlelike insects that are about ½ to 1 inch in size. They are usually dark brown and have a pair of pincers at the tip of the abdomen. Earwigs are typically active at night and hide in cracks, crevices, or under bark but also can be active or seen during the day in similar places. They are also commonly found in subterranean burrows in areas with sandy or clay soils. Their diet typically consists of armyworms, aphids, mites, scales, and occasionally dead insects. They are completely harmless to humans.

The female earwig will lay about 50 tiny eggs in their burrows that hatch out after 7 days. After passing through several nymphal stages, they become adults in a little under 60 days. Earwigs are considered a mechanical fix because they are very difficult to control with chemicals. Outdoor perimeter applications in the proper areas can be efficient in controlling earwigs.